A microfluidics specialist joins Allozymes team

We are excited to welcome Patrick Tan to the Allozymes team as our Senior Microfluidics Scientist! 

A microfluidics specialist has joined our team at Allozymes and we are thrilled to be joined by his expertise. Patrick has a strong expertise in microfluidics and its use in many applications, such as demonstrating an interpretation of droplet-based microfluidics as a form of novel electronic musical instruments or the use of AI to control the generation of droplets. 

Prior to joining Allozymes, Patrick spent the last 8 years at Griffith University in Australia as a research and postdoctoral associate, leading a team of students and researchers to work on various droplet-based microfluidic projects. He received numerous awards for his outstanding and innovative efforts during this period. Patrick received his Bachelor’s in 2008 and Master’s in 2010 degrees here in Singapore at Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and obtained his Ph.D. in 2014 at The University of Göttingen in Germany,​​  in one of the leading microfluidic labs, the Baret lab, pioneering many microfluidic applications, before making the move to Australia 2015. He received numerous awards such as the ARC DECRA fellowship, Lab on Chip Emerging Investigator and the Tan Kah Kee Young Inventor for his outstanding and innovative efforts during this period.

Patrick is a strong team player who values mentorship opportunities, having spent years volunteering in schools and local science centres promoting and helping to encourage the youth of Singapore to strive in their science studies. 

Upon joining Allozymes, Patrick shared that this career move for him was like, “Embarking on a new adventure to live the life of my dream, putting to use my expertise in microfluidics.”

Welcome to the team, Patrick, we are excited to embark on this adventure with you and look forward to continuing to make Allozymes an innovative company. 

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